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Fertility Food Friday: Farro, Walnut & Massaged Kale Salad

By Krista A. Parr, R.H.N.
@RootToFruitRHN

Spring is a time when our bodies are naturally trying cleanse and detoxify. We can support this process by eating foods that stimulate the liver to do its job effectively, such as kale, green onion, radish, and lemon, all featured in this hearty Spring salad.

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Fertility Food Friday: Grilled Vegetable and Farro Salad

Fertility boosting recipe by Genesis Fertility Centre in Vancouver

 

Recipe by Krista A. Parr

Farro is an ancient strain of wheat with a much lower gluten content and a much higher protein content than common wheat. It’s also packed with magnesium, zinc, iron, B vitamins and fiber; all important elements of a balanced fertility diet. With a mild nutty flavor and a chewy but firm texture, farro really works well in salads. Better than quinoa, in my opinion, because it won’t become soggy after marinating in the fridge with veggies and dressing after a few days. While there are many nutrients in this salad that are supportive of male and female fertility, its best quality may be that it sets you up for healthy eating success.  Once you have this salad in your fridge (it makes a very large batch!) it is a quick, healthy, nutrient-dense meal or snack that is ready to eat with no further preparation. It’s also versatile: bring to a potluck or picnic, serve as a side dish with whatever is going on the BBQ, or pack it for lunch on top of a bed of lettuce and an avocado on the side. You may wonder why the recipe asks you to melt butter to grill the veggies rather than simply drizzling on olive oil. Butter is a saturated fat which is not easily damaged by high heat cooking (ie. BBQ). Damaged fats behave like free radicals in your body, causing damage to your tissues. As a mono-unsaturated fat, olive oil is more delicate than butter and easily damaged by heat, light, and air. When you consume olive oil raw, it rewards you with numerous health benefits, but when you heat it (especially high heat like BBQ grilling), olive oil becomes a damaged, dangerous fat. If you don’t want to use butter, coconut oil is another great option for high-heat cooking.

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Wellness Wednesdays: Folic Acid

 

Folic acid and fertility

If you’re in the process of trying to get pregnant or are currently pregnant, be sure to consume a healthy dose of folic acid.

If you’re in the process of trying to get pregnant or are currently pregnant, one thing is for sure. Maternal health and fetal health go hand in hand. One of the most important things that a woman can do for her unborn child is to make sure she takes her folic acid. Folic acid can help to prevent serious birth defects in our children.

Folic acid, also known as folate, comes from many different foods including leafy green vegetables like the popular kale and spinach. It can also be found in orange juice and grains.

A healthy dose of folic acid can help prevent and reduce the risk of babies being born with neural tube defects – serious birth defects involving incomplete development of the brain, spine or spinal cord.

Varying doses of folic acid are prescribed for different people and their health statuses.

Healthy patients with no medical issues require a well-balanced diet full of folate-rich foods and daily supplementation with a multivitamin with folic acid (0.4–1.0 mg) for at least two to three months before conception, throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period (4–6 weeks and as long as breastfeeding continues).

Patients who need a higher dose of folic acid (5mg) are:

  • Patients with health risks, including epilepsy, insulin-dependent diabetes and obesity (Body Mass Index [BMI] greater than 35);
  • Those who have a family history of neural tube defects;
  • People belonging to a high-risk ethnic group, e.g. Sikhs require an increased dietary intake of folate-rich foods and daily supplementation with multivitamins with 5 mg of folic acid.

Patients who require a higher dose of folate should consume the vitamin at least three months before conception and continue its intake throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period.

In a nutshell, folic acid is a mandatory ingredient in the recipe of pregnancy.

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